If we plan, then we can effectively measure; and if we measure, we can effectively improve.

I just read the latest Clickz article from Bryan Eisenberg and the headline I used came from a previous column quoting John Quarto-vonTivadar (a real pirate name!) :) .

Look at the headline again.
If we plan we can effectively measure; and if we measure we can effectively improve.

Look at the first part;

If we plan we can effectively measure. This is as John comments the part most people have problems with.

Picture if you will an island surrounded by a deep ocean. In this island you have your pot of gold. The difference between this island and a real pirate treasure island is that you want all the seafarers that happen onto the island to find your pot of gold.

The plan, the persuasive scenario if you like is to find every small step, every on the way to the treasure and clearly signpost it for the visitors. From landing on the shore (er the landing page) to the woodland path, to the fork in the road, back to the woodland path, to getting lost in the tropical forest, to walking up a creek, to finding the woodland path again, to going back to the ship to get some grub, then getting back again onto the forest path, before finally, finally the seafarer sees the value in your pot of gold and starts really moving toward it until at last the moment he picks up the pot of gold and legs it back to his ship! Conversion aha!

That is key, actually developing a plan first so that every possible action (path) is covered and attempts to persuade the persona at each point. So the beach has to have easy access to the woodland path, and the tropical forest has to have lots of different methods to eventually get you back to the path, make you remember it, be persuaded that going up the woodland path isn’t going to get you into trouble. This is my crazy view of what planning is about!

The first step to planning such a difficult set of journeys is to figure out who the people are, who are going to actually take those journeys. You have to uncover the most likely person to take the particular path that you’re planning for them. And then do the same again for different types of people, who might have landed at the airport up the road! đŸ˜‰

The trick is then to figure out how to measure those persuasive scenarios. This is where I start to wonder how it’s done. Persuasive Architecture seems to have a method to do this, using current web analytics tools. Are these any tools? or just one or two of the more expensive ones? In fact I’ll quote Bryan;

“We’ve developed a method to use current Web analytics tools to measure persuasion scenarios, though it does requires some report customization.”

I’m real interested in the methods behind this. Hopefully Bryan will share this with us at the E-Metrics Summit in London (which we’re attending/speaking) so that we can help you to further understand the value of planning before measuring.

Steve is a well known analytics specialist, author and speaker. A pioneer since 2002, he established one of the first European web analytics consultancies (Aboavista), later acquired by Satama (now Trainers’ House) in 2006. In 2008 he wrote his first book Cult Of Analytics published on May 14th 2009. He currently serves as CEO at Quru and has presented and keynoted web analytics topics across Europe. These include The Internet Marketing Conference (Stockholm), The Search Engine strategies (Stockholm), IIH (Copenhagen), the IAB Finland (Helsinki), Media Plaza (Amsterdam), Design For Conversion (Amsterdam) The eMetrics Summit (London, Munich, Stockholm), Divia (Helsinki) in addition to sitting on dozens of panels.

Posted in General, Web Analytics

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